Tag Archives: hot pot

AMAZING Weekend Lunch Deal at Shabu Tatsu

Shabu Tatsu
Shabu Tatsu
216 E 10th St
(between 2nd Ave & 1st Ave)
New York, NY 10003

I decided I love weekend lunches. Not brunches. But lunches. I love eggs but rarely feel that I’ll find a good enough eggs benedict to wait in line for… that being said, I recently found a place where I don’t have to wait in line.

I digress. Soba-Ya has always been a favorite of mine. LAW and I go almost every weekend for our weekly dose of delicious salmon sashimi, torched tuna, unagi over rice, and cold dipping soba. The price is just right, always under $20 each with tax and tip. Recently, we decided we had been going to Soba-Ya TOO much and decided to venture out to some other lunch deals in East Village.

Shabu TatsuWe searched Yelp and found Shabu Tatsu, which I always love going for dinner for Japanese hot pot. We found that they also have a weekend lunch menu that seemed too good to be true. They have these lunch sets that range from $12 to $14 and come with egg drop soup and salad.  Continue reading AMAZING Weekend Lunch Deal at Shabu Tatsu

Pig Feet in NYC! – at Hakata Tonton

Hakata Tonton
61 Grove St
(between S 7th Ave & Sheridan Sq)
New York, NY 10014

We celebrated T.C.’s birthday at this small Japanese restaurant in the West Village. It has a maximum capacity of about 25 people. The seats and tables are all wooden. There is a gigantic red lantern in the middle of the restaurant. People are engaged in animated conversations but the noise level is a consistent soft humming.

We shared the Seaweed Salad ($5) with yuzu ponzu dressing. Nothing special here. Just a nice, light salad to start the meal.

We then shared the Grilled Pork Tonsoku ($7) with scallion and ponzu sauce, which was like the Ratatouille moment when critic Ego, at the end of the film, has a bite of the ratatouille for the first time. He experiences this crazy flashback to his childhood when his mother made him the homiest, tastiest ratatouille. Pork tonsoku is pork feet, something my grandmother always prepared for my mom and something my mom always prepared for me. The Hakata Tonton version is delicious. It has a very rich, chewy texture (think tendon meets fat…) and the exterior is perfectly grilled so it is slightly charred and crisp. I am thinking about going back and just ordering one of these for myself with a bowl of rice.

Continue reading Pig Feet in NYC! – at Hakata Tonton

Shabu Tatsu: Healthy, Hearty, and Delicious!


Shabu Tatsu
216 E 10th St
(between 2nd Ave & 1st Ave)
New York, NY 10003

 

Shabu Tatsu serves up traditional shabu shabu, aka. Japanese hot pot.  Its name comes from the sound of swishing your meats in the hot water.  Unlike Chinese hot pot, shabu shabu is much lighter.  It uses a dashi broth made from just hot water and seaweed.  Chinese hot pot is heavier and often uses a hearty pork bone broth or an extremely spicy beef stock with various seasonings.  I prefer Japanese hot pot because the light broth cooks the meat and vegetables without masking their natural flavors.  Though, because the broth has no real seasoning effects, you need very fresh ingredients and deliciously fragrant dipping sauces.  Normally shabu shabu is served with ponzu sauce and a sesame sauce.  In addition to the sauces, Shabu Tatsu also brought freshly chopped scallions and daikon to mix in.

  

We ordered the Prime Rib-Eye Beef Shabu-Shabu Dinner Course, which was $26 per person.  $26 is a lot to pay for cooking yourself some veggies and meat in a boiling pot of hot water, but Shabu Tatsu really showed me how it is completely worth it.  The set included an amazing vegetable platter and of course, a big plate of prime rib-eye.  The vegetables were extremely fresh – no stringy veggies to be found.  The veggie platter also included tofu and Kishimen (wide and flat wheat noodles) and Malony (fat, rounded, and translucent noodles made of potato and corn starch).

  

The prime rib-eye was cut in the perfect thickness (not thin to the point of papery non-existence… something you find in some shabu places… but still thin enough to be cooked in just a few seconds… and thick enough to taste like meaty meat).  Because shabu meats are served raw, they have to be high enough quality to be eaten raw… this is definitely not enforced in certain places.  Shabu Tatsu’s meat is very high quality, smooth and did not contain any knots or stringy bits.

Continue reading Shabu Tatsu: Healthy, Hearty, and Delicious!