Tag Archives: egg

Lunch by the Marche d’Aligre


On our last day in Paris, before our afternoon flight, we got up early and checked out the Marche d’Aligre, one of the more traditional and popular outdoor markets in Paris. Imagine walking through tight rows of vendors yelling a slur of French words at you that have something to do with the beautiful fresh fruits and vegetables that they are selling. Bunches of bulbous grapes ranging from soft yellow to deep purple, bright red tomatoes bursting with juice, creamy avocados cut open with slices to sample… god it’s beautiful. Unlike the farmers’ markets in NYC, the produce at this marche were just glowing with freshness. I felt like I could taste the tomatoes by just looking at them. The lively environment with local frenchies hustling and bustling about for their week’s groceries also added to the fun. After we wandered around and didn’t buy anything (I so wish we had come on day 1… I would’ve gotten so many fruits), we hopped on over to a cafe for lunch. I can’t remember the name of the cafe but I’m sure I have it written down somewhere and will update when I find out.


I had the Croque-Madame, which is simply a croque-monsieur (grilled toast with ham and cheese) with an egg on top. Though it looked very pretty, the toast was a bit overtoasted and so lost the soft chewy center of great bread. The whole thing just tasted like crust. Ham was very mediocre quality (like packaged sandwich ham), unlike most of the amazing cured jambon’s we had at other places. Sorry to ruin the photo for you guys.  Continue reading Lunch by the Marche d’Aligre

Egg and Tomato, a homely meal (re-post)

This week has been busier than usual. I suck for not posting and I feel terrible about it. I’m going to suck even more after this because I am going to re-post a blog post from earlier this year when I made Egg and Tomato noodles for myself. It’s one of those weeks where I just miss home and crave homely foods, such as these noodles. Here is my post from March, 2012:

Still sick in bed.  I have very little energy today so I am going to repost a photo and add the recipe for it.  Egg and Tomato (鸡蛋炒西红柿) is a classic Chinese dish that every household makes when in need of a quick and simple dish.   Continue reading Egg and Tomato, a homely meal (re-post)

Soba-Ya: Buta Kakuni (braised pork belly with poached egg in soy sauce broth)

Soba-Ya
229 E 9th St
(between 2nd Ave & 3rd Ave)
New York, NY 10003

 

First very important note: ask to have this come with your noodles or rice. The soup and pork belly are so flavorful that you’ll want to have something with it.

 

The pork belly is tender and surprisingly lean.  I find that most pork belly dishes come with fat juicy pieces: half fat, half meat. To be honest, I did wish there was a little more fat because the large piece of lean pork belly seemed a bit dry at times.  The egg actually did not resemble a poached egg as the yolk was not runny in the center. The yolk had somewhat condensed a bit and was at that beautiful transition between watery and fully cooked. The center was orange and had an amazing soft yet bouncy texture (vivacious viscous viscera as a friend said). It was more a soft-boiled egg than a poached egg, which I tend to prefer anyway. This egg rivals my favorite seasoned soft-boiled egg at Ippudo. The broth was light and was complimented very well by the fresh scallions.

Ippudo: Wasabi Tonkotsu Ramen

Ippudo
65 4th Ave
(between 9th St & 10th St)
New York, NY 10003

I wanted to try something new at Ippudo because I always get the Modern. The Modern is a tasty milky pork broth with a hint of roasted garlic flavor. I have also tried the Miso and the Chicken Broth ones as well. Both are good but do not compare to the more flavorful Modern. We were all craving ramen but did not want to make the trek to Totto so ended up at Ippudo. The Wasabi Tonkotsu ramen was the perfect “try something new” ramen because it was delicious and different. The soup was infused with Wasabi and the ramen was the curly kind, not the straight kind you usually get at Ippudo. Definitely have a side of their seasoned soft boiled egg because it is the best!  Lines are usually crazy long.  We went at around 11pm and still had to wait.

But seriously, if you really want some amazing ramen, check out Totto.

Egg and Tomato Noodles

This is a classic homestyle dish in China, my kind of comfort food. I scrambled some eggs and took them off the heat before they were completely done (to ensure they are soft and fluffy later). Then sautéed some diced tomatoes with sugar and salt. Added in the eggs and simmered until I started getting a soup. Boiled noodles on the side for just a few minutes so the noodles were still chewy and not overcooked. Mixed together soup/sauce with drained noodles and nom nom nom…

Flour Bakery (Cambridge, MA): Breakfast Sandwich

Flour Bakery
190 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139

 

Breakfast sandwich with egg, ham, cheddar, arugula, and homemade dijon

 

Craving this right now… You would be surprised at how bad and good breakfast sandwiches can taste because they are all essentially bread and egg. But like all food with simple recipes, the subtleties are important. Ratios and fresh fresh fressshhhhh ingredients.  This one here is a true gem.

Pulino’s: Funghi Breakfast Pizza

Pulino’s
282 Bowery
New York, NY 10012

 

Funghi Breakfast Pizza (eggs, mushrooms, pancetta, creme fraiche, grana)

 

Much better than I thought it would be because the reviews were very so-so!  I wish the egg was spread out better so I wouldn’t have to do it (then again, I wouldn’t be able to sneakily take more egg for myself either…).  Pancetta was a very good/necessary ingredient.  The saltiness of it cut the creamy creme fraiche, grana (a type of cheese… sometimes called Parmesan -french- or Parmigiano Reggiano -Italian- … pretentious much?), and eggs so it wasn’t so nauseating.

 

Crust was decent but tasted extra yummy because of the chili oil they had on the side.  After a few bites, I noticed that the chili oil tasted exactly like Lao Gan Ma sauce (a Chinese sauce every Chinese know/should know about).