Category Archives: New York

Attention NYC: Yunnan rice noodles in EV at Yuan

Yuan
157 Second Ave (8th St)
New York, NY 10003

NOODLE LOVERS! LISTEN UP! YOU MAY THINK YOU’VE TRIED ALL THE TYPES OF CHINESE NOODLES. KNIFE-PEELED AND HAND-PULLED ARE NOW COMMONLY ON THE NOODLE ROTATION.

But, have you had Yunnan rice noodles? This is a totally different breed than Vietnamese pho, Cantonese wide “he fen” rice noodles at dim sum, or even vermicelli. It generally has a spaghetti-like thickness and roundness, but is much lighter (because it’s rice) and is very chewy and slippery. It has to be made fresh so its not super commonly found. I’ve always loved going to Yunnan restaurants growing up in China but never saw one in Manhattan (upon further research now, it seems that there are a few out there but not well known). Now there is one right in EV! Me, K.C., and H.K. checked it out recently. Continue reading Attention NYC: Yunnan rice noodles in EV at Yuan

DUMPLING GALAXY 🌌


Dumpling Galaxy
42-35 Main Street
(Franklin Avenue)
Flushing

I. Love. Dumplings. So. Much.

Dumplings are my ultimate comfort food I think. Especially the handmade kind where the skin is not too thin nor too thick… where the skin has this amazing stretchy, chewy texture. Machine-made skin is so boring compared to handmade. It’s just thin. And just thin is never good. Handmade can be thin yet have so many other qualities. But poorly handmade skin where it is so thick it’s like bread is also no good. It’s hard to find a good dump. Ranking would probably be:

Handmade Thin Skin > Machine-made Thin Skin > Handmade Thick Skin

Okay now that you understand the skin, onto the fillings. The best fillings are ones that are not too fat or lean (GOTTA GET ‘EM JUST RIGHT), that have an ingredient combo that when cooked, excretes a juice worthy of having as a standalone soup. My mom makes the best dumplings. The skin is not too thin or thick, the fillings not too fat or lean, and sized just right so you pop one into your mouth all at once each time – maximizing the juice intake. Continue reading DUMPLING GALAXY 🌌

Madame Vo for Bun Bo Hue and Pho


Madame Vo
212 East 10th St (2nd Ave)
New York, NY 10003

Quick post for a place that deserves a quick bite. Madame Vo is one of two new vietnamese restaurants to open in East Village this year (the other is Hanoi House). I promise to try Hanoi House soon to do a comparison, but first up we have my review of Madame Vo. Full disclosure, I actually got the two mixed up because my instafeed was blowing up with photos from both places. I wanted to go to the one that had the pho with a massive bone marrow in the bone – turns out that one is Hanoi House…

Nonetheless, I went to Madame Vo twice within two weeks.


The vietnamese coffee ($4) tastes like chilled, melted coffee ice cream. It was good, very tasty, but definitely more of a dessert than a beverage.


The summer rolls ($9) with shrimp, vermicelli, lettuce, chive, and basil are high quality. The rice paper skin was not overly soft or hard – perfectly chewy. Shrimp was cooked just right – tasted just lightly poached. It’s a bit pricey for what you get, but definitely higher quality than the usual summer roll.


LAW hates soup noodles (it’s odd) so he got the grilled pork chops ($16) which came with a side of crab cakes and rice. Given all the buzz around the pho, I was pretty certain my dish would win. Looking back, LAW may have won this one. That pork chop was so damn delicious. It had this scallion oil all over it. It was perfectly marinated and charred. Paired with a side of daikon + carrot pickles, it was tres tasty. Crab cake was kinda random. A weird pairing in my opinion. I would rather them get rid of it and lower the price of the dish. Continue reading Madame Vo for Bun Bo Hue and Pho

Okonomi: a perfect Japanese breakfast


Okonomi
150 Ainslie St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

We were told the wait was two and a half hours. We waited two full hours. And. It. Was. Worth. It.

Okonomi is a tiiiiiny little Japanese restaurant tucked away on the north side of Williamsburg. It opens from 9am-3pm on weekdays, and 10am-4pm on weekends (at night, the restaurant becomes Yuji Ramen). It serves only traditional Japanese ichiju-sansai set meals for breakfast and lunch. “Ichiju-sansai” literally means  “One soup, three dishes”  – aka a healthy set meal.


I was pretty skeptical with the raving reviews. How good could breakfast really be? I did my little Yelp search beforehand and saw all the photos. The food looked pretty and small – usually the opposite of how I like my food. We got there at 10:30am on a Saturday and already saw a long line forming out the door. Someone sat outside with a suitcase – that’s when you know the place is good. That person NEEDED to eat here before jetsetting off.


Two full hours later, me, N.T., B.J., and A.H. got seated across from this couple.


You can only order the ichiju-sansai (set menu) (~$30), but can choose your fish. We had a choice of Spanish mackerel, some kind of tilefish, and a sashimi over rice bowl. I got the Spanish mackerel, which is pictured here along with all the other dishes. (FYI those flowers were real :)) Continue reading Okonomi: a perfect Japanese breakfast

Traif: Asian Influenced Tapas & Bacon Donuts =O

Traif
Traif
229 S 4th St
Brooklyn, NY 11211 (South Williamsburg)

I had been wanting to go to Traif for a long time. It’s consistently rated as one of the best places to eat in Williamsburg (4.5 stars on Yelp O.O and wow two billyburg restaurants in a row for me). Traif is a “new American” restaurant that serves up tapas with Asian and bacon flavors. It is also known for its bacon donuts – that curiosity alone was enough to entice me…

Traif
I started with the Rude Little Pig cocktail, which is made with lapsang-infused tequila orange liqueur, and a pomegranate bacon rim. Can’t say it’s particularly amazing but it was a pretty stiff drink. Bacon rim sounds better than it tasted. You couldn’t really taste it at all. It was actually pretty annoying to have to deal with bacon crummies in my drink. This start aside, everything else was pretty great.

Traif
We were gifted a sweet potato-y soup from the chef. Super delicious. So creamy and vibrant – the perfect little taster to get the taste buds going for the rest of the meal. By the way, I didn’t note all the prices and the menu changes pretty frequently. Just know that each dish is about $11-$20 ish.

Traif
Toasted spaetzle with roasted mushrooms. TBH, not the biggest fan of spaetzle because of how grainy it tastes. It’s the same reason why I can’t stand whole wheat pasta. Brown rice, whole wheat bread, anything else really I’m all for. Something about grainy noodles just doesn’t make sense to me. They should be al dente, not grainy. Anyway, of all the spaetzles of the land that I’ve had, this is pretty good, I guess. Cant go wrong with cheese and mushrooms. Continue reading Traif: Asian Influenced Tapas & Bacon Donuts =O

Win Son: new Taiwanese joint that is def worth a try

Win SonWin Son
159 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11206

I know. It’s been for. ever. I could give you some bullpoop excuse about how I’ve been really busy and feel soooo bad for not writing about all my recent food adventures, but the truth is the reason I haven’t posted in a long time is because I recently switched jobs and for the first time in my life am super happy and with what I’m doing (it’s sort of food related!) and no longer feel the need to find another way to do something I care about. That being said, now that I’m more settled in, I hope I’m better about updating because I’ve been eating at some bomb butt places lately. Win Son as the most recent!

H.K., my truest Brooklynite friend, somehow was able to convince me and K.C. to trek to East Williamsburg on a school night (I’m a brat). And it was totally worth it. Win Son is a new Taiwanese-American restaurant opened up by Josh Ku and Trigg Brown (former sous chef at Upland). The food tastes and looks like homemade Chinese food – no frills, just good, with a lot of the same ingredients used over and over again.

Win Son
Marinated Cucumbers ($5) with garlic and cilantro and A TON OF THEIR AMAZING FRIED GARLIC THINGS. Simple and amazing. Simply amazing.

Win Son
Oyster Omelette ($11) with A TON OF THEIR AMAZING FRIED GARLIC THINGS. Oysters are whole and fresh – still mostly raw even. Legit.

Win Son
Pan-griddled Pork Buns ($9) with scallions and chili vinaigrette and A TON OF THEIR AMAZING FRIED GARLIC THINGS. This might have been my favorite thing from the night. The chili vinaigrette is slightly slightly spicy, slightly sweet, slightly acidic. Super nomz. Skin is not too thin nor too thick. Pork is tender. Snaps for these buns. Continue reading Win Son: new Taiwanese joint that is def worth a try

Poke Post #2: Wisefish

Wisefish Poke
Wisefish Poke
263 West 19th St (6th Ave)
New York, NY 10011

Alright food friends. Quick update here. I went to Wisefish recently with N.T., G.B., H.W., and LAW to do a little taste comparison against the glorious Sons of Thunder. Just by photo comparison, you can see the main difference between the two: Wisefish poke bowls have a lot more stuff. The ordering mechanism is different. At Sons of Thunder, you pick your fish (or octopus or tofu or whatever) and that’s it. It comes with greens, radishes, seaweed salad, etc.  You can also add toppings like krispies (yes do this), nori, avocado, etc. for an additional price. At Wisefish, you pick your fish and then get unlimited toppings from their toppings bar. It’s like the new-ish PinkBerry method where you pay a little more but get as many toppings (edamame, hijiki, radish, etc) as you want – or more precisely, as many as will fit in the bowl/you’re shameless enough to ask for. The price ends up being similar.

Because at Sons of Thunder I have to pick and pay for each additional topping, I find that I cherish/appreciate those toppings that much more. Also, a bigger point here, the quality of fish is just better at Sons of Thunder. The Wisefish tuna and salmon are cut into smaller cubes and are a bit…. softer (maybe marinated too much?) and stringy-er. Though, the fish quality isn’t a dealbreaker because it’s still decent and the number of toppings and sauces you can get sort of makes up for it. You should certainly go if you’re in the area. If the purpose of your meal is to have the best poke on the other hand, I would go to Sons of Thunder (I still have Pokeworks to try so I’ll let you know if my assessment changes). Continue reading Poke Post #2: Wisefish

THE SONS OF THUNDER HAVE ARRIVED! Embrace the poke bowl!

Sons of Thunder
Sons of Thunder
204 East 38th St (between 2nd and 3rd Ave)
New York, NY 10016

Thank the gods that the Sons of Thunder have arrived in desolate Murray Hill, where prior to this moment, the most exciting thing to have happened of late is still Eons (the Greek Chipotle). After tasting poke (pronounced poh-kay) for the first time in Hawaii, I was surprised poke did not exist EVERYwhere. It’s tuna (or salmon or octopus or whatever you want) marinated in delicious sauces over rice. Basically chirashi with spicy mayo. Who wouldn’t like that? And like all my great business ideas, a five second google search showed me that poke very much does exist in NYC and happens to have just exploded in the last few months.  Perfect timing on my part, per usual.

Sons of Thunder is one of two other new poke-specific spots to have opened recently in Manhattan. The other two are Pokeworks and Wisefish. Yelp tells me they’re pretty good but don’t seem quite as good as my little neighborhood gem…. I’ll follow-up with posts about the other two and let you know what I think. For now – my review of Sons of Thunder (I’m going to try to say their name as many times as I can in this post because Sons of Thunder is just too epic of a name. Sons of Thunder.)

Sons of Thunder
The fast-casual restaurant is located randomly on 38th street and 3rd Ave. The space is huge (for NYC standards) and beautifully designed to have a very LA/Hawaiian feel. The place has wooden tables, surfer posters, pretty lights, and a massive, gorgeous skylight towering above the seating area. The space is the definition of chill. Murray Hill – please take note of this spot and learn to evolve to have more places like this.

Sons of Thunder

LAW and I each ordered our own poke bowls ($10.75 each). You have the choice of tuna, salmon, octopus, or golden beets/tofu over white rice or brown rice. You can also do half and half, which is what I did here. I had the spicy half tuna half salmon with an additional topping of “krispies” which is basically fried ginger and garlic (NOM). The bowl itself comes with a small green salad and seaweed salad. Having eaten there a bunch of times now, I know that they change up the salad ingredients all the time (this time I had these awesome turnips in my salad). The combo of the fresh fish, chewy rice, crispy krispies, and crunch from the salad (seaweed and cucumber) … is awesome. Continue reading THE SONS OF THUNDER HAVE ARRIVED! Embrace the poke bowl!

Mimi Cheng’s Dumplings (there’s a Thanksgiving dumpling!)

Mimi Cheng's
Mimi Cheng’s
179 Second Ave (between 11th and 12th streets)
New York, NY

When Mimi Cheng’s first opened in 2014, I was skeptical. But now I feel bad for judging Mimi before even trying them out. I was skeptical because it seemed like an upscale dumpling restaurant pandering to people who are willing to pay too much for, what I assumed to be, meh dumplings. There was too much branding. Too much buzz. For some reason, I thought a polished restaurant couldn’t be a great dumpling restaurant. It’s like having an expensive chicken and rice.

Mimi Cheng's
But now thinking about it, why can’t we have an expensive chicken and rice? Why is it that Korean food is in general more expensive than Chinese food? Or that French food is almost always pretty upscale? It can’t just be that ingredients may be more expensive. I should be promoting the elevation of Chinese food!

Mimi Cheng's
Anyway, let me get back to Mimi’s. The place is super cute. It always seems to be bright inside. Lots of natural light. They have a good spot.

Mimi Cheng's
I had the boiled Reinvented Classic (six piece for $8), which had a filling of pasture-raised pork, baby bok choy, and cabbage. The classic is usually pork with cabbage. The addition of the baby bok choy was great. More color and an extra bit of crunch. You can taste that the meat is so much higher quality than the usual chinatown dumpling. It was tender yet not full of fat, and did not contain any cartilage bits that you sometimes get with chinatown dumplings… really tasty and light. How dumplings should be! Continue reading Mimi Cheng’s Dumplings (there’s a Thanksgiving dumpling!)

Hell’s Chicken: G-Free Fried Chicken & the Best Bibimbap in NYC

Hell's Chicken
Hell’s Chicken
641 10th Ave (45th St)
New York, NY 10036

I was invited to try Hell’s Chicken last week and accepted immediately because who would give up an opportunity for fried chicken? The restaurant also prides itself it making gluten-free fried chicken. I’m the last person to be drawn to gluten-free but I can imagine some of my readers’ ears may perk up at the sound of that. So off I went! I brought LAW along with me so we could try more foods. The restaurant is in – surprise, surprise – Hell’s Kitchen where there are very few options for good Asian food. Keep this one in mind next time you’re stuck there (because there’s no good reason to linger around there).

Hell's Chicken
We started with a Korean classic: Japchae ($10 + $2 with beef, pork, or shrimp). Japchae is like the Chinese rice noodle and beef dish (干炒牛河) except its noodles are made with sweet potato glass noodles. The Hell’s Chicken version is on the sweeter side and has a strong kick from all those scallions. I’m no japchae connoisseur so can’t tell you how authentic it is, but it was good.  Continue reading Hell’s Chicken: G-Free Fried Chicken & the Best Bibimbap in NYC